Playing with the Olympus 60mm f/2.8 Macro

Even since purchasing my Panasonic GF5 last winter, I’ve wanted a macro lens. Those who are familiar with the micro four thirds system know that there are only two macro lenses for it. The quite expensive Panasonic/Leica 45mm f/2.8, and the newer and slightly less expensive Olympus 60mm f/2.8. Currently, Olympus has some decently sized instant rebates on a large selection of lenses, including the 60mm f/2.8 macro, so I picked one up.

Above is a side by side comparison of the Panasonic Lumix 14-42mm, Olympus 60mm macro, and the Panasonic Lumix 45-175mm. In comparison to all the Panasonic lenses I have, the Olympus is quite narrow. This makes it look much longer in the product photos than it really is.

Below is a set of sample picture I took when playing around with the Olympus 60mm on my GF5. A few things to note, in several instances the GF5 had trouble getting the lens to focus (lots of back and forth focusing). I had better luck using manual focus mode. Additionally, the depth of field of the Olympus 60mm at f/2.8 isn’t very great. I ended up going into aperture priority mode to stop down to f/5 to get a reasonable DOF.

-John Havlik

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Panasonic Lumix GF5

Always keeping an eye out for camera deals, back in November a deal on the Panasonic Lumix GF5 caught my eye. While I love my S90, something with a larger sensor that would allow me to do more in lower light situations (though I realize it isn’t any better than the S90 for long exposure).

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HP ProLiant MicroServer Screw Location

After unpacking my ProLiant MicroServer (it will replace Atomtux as the Atom 330 just isn’t cutting it anymore speed wise), I was expecting to see a packet of screws for the hard drive bays (has a 4x cold swappable 3.5″ SATA HDD bays). Alas, there was no packet. After a little searching, I found the screws, along with a wrench for them. They are attached to the door covering the hard drive caddies.

There are 16 screws attached to the door for hard drives, and 4 for an optical drive (to be placed in the 5.25″ bay). Yes, there are 4 extra hard drive screws (one bay comes populated with a 250GB Seagate hard drive).

-John Havlik

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My Running Headlamp: the Princeton Tec Eos

Last September, my old Princeton Tec Matrix’s battery compartment clip broke and the tilt adjustment wore out (would not stay up). While annoying, I hadn’t really ever used this headlamp for running. November came, and with it so did dark nights. It was time to get a new headlamp. While I’d love to have a Princeton Tec Apex, it wasn’t within my price range, and is a little heavy to wear while running.

After some searching, I narrowed the field to two candidates, the Princeton Tec Remix and the Princeton Tec Eos. Both are LED based headlamps, the Remix has three low power “indicator” LEDs plus a 1W high power LED. The Eos has only the high power LED. While I would like to have the LED setup of the Remix, it has one fatal flaw. The Remix does not have a gasket seal, and thus it is not waterproof. As my previous two headlamps were waterproof, this single feature sold me on the Eos.

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Pointless Tab

What do you do when you are trying to keep symmetry in your device, but only have 2 speakers and a volume rocker to fill the spaces? If you’re HP, you’ll hide the serial number barcode on a popout tab in this fourth space.

Naturally, they could have done something useful with the space. Placing a SD (or micro SD) card slot in this location comes to mind. Possibly, this was going to hold the SIM for the 3G version that was never released. Regardless, it is still odd.

-John Havlik

[end of transmission, stay tuned]